Popular

Articles How to Store water, Can Food, Dehydrate Fruits, Dehydrate Meats, Dehydrate Vegetables...

Types of Food Storage Survival Food Storage, Emergency Food Storage, Long Term Food Storage...

Types of Foods to Store Wheat, Rice, Beans, Oats...

Types of Preservation Methods Freeze Dried, Canned, Dehydrated, Frozen...

Types of Food Containers Cans and Glass Jars, No.10 Cans, Vacuum Sealer Bags, Mylar Bags, 5 Gallon Buckets...

Why Start a Home Food Storage? We are guessing you already know...

How to Store Water Article about storing water at home...

 

Wheat

Wheat should make up the bulk of the grains you store, recommended to be at about 50 percent of your total grain storage.

While wheat to look at doesn't seem to be anything more than a type of glorified grass, it is extremely important when it comes to sustaining life. Everybody should have wheat stored in their home food storage because it really is the "bread of life". Wheat is an affordable source of protein for most of the world and is one of the grains that countries will put aside for the "hard times" ahead. Even America, the "land of plenty", has wheat held in reserve for emergencies.

An adult male needs approximately 300 pounds of grains to sustain life for a year. (Keep in mind this is just grains, this does not include proteins, fats, sugars, etc.) Of these 300 pounds of grains, almost 150 of it should be wheat.

Wheat is usually separated into different types by both the time it's been planted in the ground and by the hardness of the kernel. If you're interested in storing wheat for a long term emergency supply, you'll want to store the hard spring and hard winter varieties. Typically they're called "hard red", or "hard white" wheat.

Hard red wheat is planted in the spring and in the winter. The kernels are small, uniform in size and have an almost red color to them. Hard red wheat that is planted in the spring has the highest protein content of all the wheat varieties; which makes it perfect for long term storage.

Hard white wheat is the newest type of wheat to be grown in the America. The kernels are a little bit larger and softer than the red wheat variety and are somewhat light in color. While white wheat doesn't carry as high of protein content as the hard red, it's such a small difference (only a few percentages less) that it also works great for long term storage.

With red wheat you're going to get coarser, denser bread. Dough made out of the white wheat will be lighter and will rise better than its counterpart. So which one you'd like to use for food storage is up to you and will depend on your own personal tastes. Some people will only store one form or the other and they have very strong opinions about it. Really though, it just depends on what taste you like better. So buy some of each in small amounts first, and then see what you'd like to eat again.

Regardless of which one you choose to store, make sure you only store it in the actual kernel. You don't want to buy it for long term storage if it's already ground into flour. (So you will need to purchase a flour mill yourself). In the flour form it begins almost immediately to lose its nutrients. However when it remains as a kernel (or it's also called a wheat berry) it retains nutrients for almost 20-30 years, when properly stored.

You will want to store the wheat kernels in either #10 food grade enamel lined cans, or in food grade buckets lined with a special lining. This will ensure it stores for the longest length of time and will keep bugs from getting into the food.

However if that's not possible, it will still last for years in a cool (60 F), dark place. The cooler the better! Just make sure to keep it off the ground so that it doesn't draw moisture up from the floor. It will store best at around 40 F.

Some tips when you go to use it: If you're using it to make bread and you'd like a "lighter" loaf, make sure to add some extra gluten to the mix. While it's not a requirement it does make the bread rise better and taste better, at least in my opinion. Also keep in mind that the wheat berries themselves can be sprouted and then eaten, which would give you a little bit of "greens" in an emergency situation.